A New Annual Event at Henvey Inlet First Nation

Pattern Canada Stories

Written By: Pattern Stories

Second Annual Henvey Inlet First Nation Fishing Derby.

Despite being a challenging year, a lot of good things were created in 2020.

One of those things is the Henvey Inlet First Nation Fishing Derby, which this September returned for its second year.

A New Annual Event

Created as a way to engage kids and provide them with a day of activities during a time of uncertainty, Henvey Inlet First Nation Right to Play was excited to make the Fishing Derby a tradition by bringing it back in 2021.

Right to Play is a nonprofit organization with a mission “to protect, educate and empower children to rise above adversity using the power of play,” as explained on their website.

A Busy Day

With support and volunteers from Nigig Power Corporation, Britt Public School, and Pattern Canada, the event was open to children aged 17 and under.

Registration started early in the morning at the Henvey Inlet First Nation Fire Hall, and judges were on hand to weigh the fish all afternoon at the docks.

The event was a “catch and release” style derby, which meant that when fish were caught, they were weighed and released back into the water.

Despite high winds and the threat of a storm, the rain held off as 20 participants and their families quickly picked out their spots along the dock and started casting their lures into the water.

Henvey Inlet Wind was proud to join Nigig Power Corporation and Pattern Canada to make available fishing rods, bate, gear, and lunch for all participants and their families. Life jackets also were available to everyone who needed one.

Fishing derby participants.

Another Successful Derby

With three age categories and two prizes per category up for grabs—for largest and smallest fish caught—every child had an opportunity to win. As a bonus prize, a local cottager donated a fishing wiggler to the child who caught the smallest fish overall.

As a bonus prize, a local cottager donated a fishing wiggler to the child who caught the smallest fish overall.

That day, quite a variety of fish were caught, including pumpkinseed panfish, rock bass, smallmouth bass, pike, and perch. The biggest fish caught that day was a bass!

Nigig Power Corporation CEO Greg Newton and Nigig Board Member Gerry Richie returned as judges this year and used a digital scale to weigh each entry.

Greg is already looking ahead to 2022.

“The event was a blast. We’re looking forward to next year’s event,” said Greg.

Boat docks.

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